Getting the board on board

Board engagement is a key ingredient to the successful integration of children’s rights issues into operations and supply chains. It is encouraging to see that attention to children’s rights issues has risen to the board level in a number of companies since 2014 (up from 13% to 30%), indicating that more companies are starting to consider children’s rights to be a topic worthy of being addressed at this level of an organization.

And yet, less than a third of companies have a board that assumes such responsibility. Although the increase since 2014 seems to follow an overall trend in which companies in general are more focused on sustainability and human rights issues, action is still called for to improve the extent to which boards are accountable for the implementation of policies related to children’s rights.

Board accountability can mean the difference between simply signing off on policies and sustainability reports, for example, and actually requiring reporting back on compliance and developments from operations. The most efficient way of accomplishing this is to integrate children’s rights issues within larger areas of concern, for example, labour rights or community impact, while continuing to recognise the greater vulnerability of children, which requires special attention.

Is your company a beginner, improver, achiever or leader when it comes to children's rights?

Take the next step

Download

For overall benchmark report results and key findings, download the report. Read industry analysis, case studies and how we can use these results to build a better future for children.

Corporate Responses to Protecting Children's Rights in the Middle East and North Africa

In an effort to provide insights and guidance on how businesses protect – or fall short in protecting – children’s rights in the Middle East and North Africa, this report draws on one of Global Child Forum’s essential research products: The corporate sector and children’s rights benchmark. More specifically, insights are provided across three areas where the corporate sector impacts children’s rights: The Workplace, The Marketplace, The Community and the Environment. In 2014, Global Child Forum, in partnership with Boston Consulting Group, published a benchmark study of the 350 largest companies in the region. This report is a follow-up to that study. An updated benchmark analysis has been conducted on 20 of the region’s largest companies.

benchmark study

Corporate Responses to Protecting Children's Rights in South America

In an effort to provide insights and guidance on how businesses protect – or fall short in protecting – children’s rights in South America, this report draws on one of Global Child Forum’s essential research products ‘The corporate sector and children’s rights benchmark’. More specifically, insights are provided across three areas where the corporate sector impacts children’s rights: The Workplace, The Marketplace, The Community and the Environment. In 2017, Global Child Forum, in partnership with Boston Consulting Group, published a benchmark study of the 300 largest companies in the region. This report is a follow-up to that study. An updated benchmark analysis has been conducted on 20 of the region’s largest companies.

benchmark study

Corporate Responses to Protecting Children's Rights in South Africa

In an effort to provide insights and guidance on how businesses protect – or fall short in protecting – children’s rights in South Africa, this report draws on one of Global Child Forum’s essential research products ‘The corporate sector and children’s rights benchmark’. More specifically, insights are provided across three areas where the corporate sector impacts children’s rights: The Workplace, The Marketplace, The Community and the Environment. In 2015, Global Child Forum, in partnership with Boston Consulting Group, published a benchmark study of the 271 largest companies in the region. This report is a follow-up to that study. An updated benchmark analysis has been conducted on 20 of the region’s largest companies.

benchmark study