Global Child Forum
11 April 2018

#GCForum18

10th Global Child Forum, Stockholm Royal Palace

On Wednesday, April 11, the 10th Global Child Forum 2018 was held at the Stockholm Royal Palace. Over 300 participants from around the world gathered to discuss child rights issues.Participants represented global companies, financial institutions, civil society, the UN, academia and government.

The day began with the H.M. King Carl Gustaf XVI welcoming the participants in remarks that  emphasizes that the child rights perspective needs to penetrate all activities:

“Companies affect children. And therefore, we must let children influence businesses. Leaders in the corporate and financial sectors have a unique opportunity to protect and strengthen children’s rights”.  His Majesty also emphasized the importance of cooperation between different sectors: “In order to realize children’s rights, cooperation is required. Companies, governments and civil society must work together, side by side. ” Read H.M. the King’s speech here.

Among the speakers during the day were Lise Kingo, CEO of UN Global Sustainability Initiative, Princess Laurentien of the Netherlands, whose Missing Chapter Foundation works to give children a voice in society, as well as Swedish Minister for Industry, Mikael Damberg.

From the organization Time to Talk! two youth workers from Indonesia, Fauza Ananda and Ruth Kesia participated, who reported on their experiences of child labor as well as their call to business to treat their youth workers with care and consideration.

The day ended with a speech by H.R.H Crown Princess Victoria on how the UN’s 17 global goals, for whom the Crown Princess is ambassador, are all linked to children’s rights.  “One thing has become increasingly clear to me. Children’s rights are not just part of the Global Goals, children’s rights are what the Global Goals are all about.Read full speech here.

During the day companies and organizations were urged to sign the Global Child Forum’s PACT Pledge – a pledge to advance children’s rights and business. Nearly 50 leading companies and organizations took up the challenge by pledging to at least one of a possible five commitments – all spurring action on children’s rights within their operations and communities.  Take the pledge here.

During the day the latest version of the Children’s Right and Business Atlas was released and showcased. The Atlas, a joint Global Child Forum-UNICEF initiative, is a digital tool allowing businesses to identify the potential impacts – and explore the opportunities – that their practices and policies have on children’s lives globally.  Read the press release here.

#GCForum18

Please scroll further down to watch our video, with highlights from Global Child Forum 2018!

Speakers

We are honoured to have the below speakers at Global Child Forum 2018.
The Global Child Forum 2018 will be opened by HM King Carl XVI Gustaf and closed by HRH Crown Princess Victoria

Mikael Damberg

Minister for Enterprise and Innovation, Swedish Government

Mr. Mikael Damberg began his political career in his twenties when he was elected as Chairman of the Swedish Social Democratic Youth League, SSU. He has served as a member of the Swedish Parliament since 2002, where he was Deputy Chairman of the Committee on Education between 2010-2012. Mr. Damberg was elected as leader of the Social Democrats in the Parliament year 2012. Since October 2014, he serves as Minister for Enterprise and Innovation in the Swedish Government.

Lise Kingo

CEO and Executive Director, UN Global Compact

Ms. Lise Kingo is the CEO and Executive Director of the United Nations Global Compact, which is the world’s largest corporate sustainability initiative with more than 13,500 signatories from 170 countries that have committed to aligning with principles on human rights, labour, environment and anti-corruption, and taking actions that advance societal goals. Prior to joining the UN Global Compact in 2015, Ms. Kingo was Chief of Staff, Executive Vice-President and member of the Executive Management team at Novo Nordisk A/S. Ms. Kingo holds multiple degrees including an MSc in Responsibility and Business Practice from the University of Bath, United Kingdom.

Fatoumata Ndiaye

Deputy Executive Director, Management, UNICEF

Ms. Fatoumata Ndiaye is the Deputy Executive Director (Management), at UNICEF. She has over 25 years of experience in audit of private and public organizations. Prior to her appointment as Deputy Executive Director (Management) in July 2015, she served as Director of UNICEF’s Office of Internal Audit and Investigations, and prior to that as Director, Internal Audit at the United Nations Secretariat. Ms. Ndiaye is a national of Senegal. She holds a Bachelor of Mathematics, a Master in Business Administration and an advance university degree in audit and control of public and private organizations.

HRH Princess Laurentien of the Netherlands

Founder, Missing Chapter Foundation

Princess Laurentien of the Netherlands is a social entrepreneur, author, strategist and dialogue facilitator. She is considered an expert in literacy, intergenerational dialogue and inclusion. In 2004, she founded the Reading & Writing Foundation, which works to prevent and reduce illiteracy. In 2009, she founded Missing Chapter Foundation, which empowers children and leaders to discuss strategic dilemmas as equals. Her dream is that inclusion of children becomes the new normal. Princess Laurentien wrote several (children’s) books and is UNESCO Special Envoy on Literacy for Development.

Natalie Au

Global Gender Director, Girl Effect

Leading teams across Girl Effect’s five offices – London, Rwanda, Ethiopia, Nigeria and Malawi – Ms. Natalie Au provides gender expertise ensuring the organisation’s girl-centric strategy runs through every brand and programme delivered. Ms. Au is also Strategic Advisor for W.E. Can Lead and a mentor for Women Mentoring in International Development. She holds an M.A. in International Politics and Human Rights from City University in London and B.A. in Women’s and Gender Studies from Occidental College in Los Angeles.

Lydia Capolicchio

Moderator of the Day

Ms. Lydia Capolicchio is a journalist and strategic communicator. Her experience has spanned three decades with assignments including news anchor, investigative documentaries and much more. She is a proven producer, director and reporter in print, radio and TV. Her clientele includes leading businesses and all levels of government. Ms. Capolicchio can be seen on stage and in the board room with well known industry leaders and politicians as well as NGO:s and civil rights people.

Fauza Ananda Chaniago

Member, Indonesian Children’s Advisory Committee, Time to Talk!

Mr. Fauza Ananda Chaniago is a member of the Indonesian Children’s Advisory Committee of the global Time to Talk! project which seeks to fulfill working children’s right to participation in decisions affecting them. Fauza is 16 years old and lives with his family in North Sumatra, Indonesia. He has worked since he was 12 years old, including jobs as a mineral water deliverer and bus cleaner. Currently, he works full-time at a printing factory. Fauza wishes to continue his studies to change his life for the better.

Anna Maria Corazza Bildt

Member of the European Parliament

Mrs. Anna Maria Corazza Bildt (M) is a MEP (EPP, SE). She is the first Vice Chair of the Committee on the Internal Market and consumer protection and Deputy Coordinator in the Women Rights Committee. She is also a member of the Civil Liberties Committee as well as of the EU-delegation to Ukraine, Joint Parliamentary Committee with Turkey and the special committee on terrorism. She chairs the Intergroup on Children´s Rights and Single Seat Campaign. Her main areas of activity are migration, security, women and children’s rights, the digital single market and food issues.

Johan Dennelind

CEO, Telia Company

Mr. Johan Dennelind is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Telia Company since 1 September 2013. Previously, he was the CEO of Vodacom International in South Africa and CEO of DiGi in Malaysia. Additionally, he has held several leading positions in the Telenor Group. Mr. Dennelind is a Board Member in World Childhood Foundation and GSMA (global industry association). He holds a Master of Science in Business Administration.

Brian Ganson

Session Moderator

Prof. Brian Ganson is Head of Africa Centre for Dispute Settlement, a hub for research and reflection on business, conflict and development. He engages with multinational companies, governments, community advocates and other international actors as a consultant, researcher, educator, and mediator. He is the author of numerous books, articles and studies on the reduction of conflict and enabling of collaboration in complex environments, and he holds appointments at the University of Stellenbosch Business School and the University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business.

Paula Guillet de Monthoux

Chair, Global Child Forum

Ms. Paula Guillet de Monthoux is the Secretary General of World Childhood Foundation, a sister organisation to the Global Child Forum. Previously, she was the Director of SOS Children’s Villages in Denmark. Prior to this she served 15+ years for UNICEF in several different management positions.

Leslie Johnston

Executive Director, C&A Foundation

Ms. Leslie Johnston joined C&A Foundation as its first Executive Director in August 2013 bringing over 20 years of management experience across multiple sectors. There, she led the development of the foundation’s first global vision and strategy, and oversees a multi-disciplined and multi-national team working to make fashion a force for good. Ms. Johnston currently serves on the boards of COFRA Foundation, GoodWeave International, CottonConnect, the Organic Cotton Accelerator, the Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs’ Executive Committee and TechnoServe’s Global Advisory Council.

Georg Kell

Chairman, Arabesque

Mr. Georg Kell is Chairman of Arabesque, an ESG Quant fund manager using self-learning quantitative models and big data to assess the performance and sustainability of globally listed companies, and Founding Director of the UN Global Compact, the world’s largest corporate sustainability movement with over 9,000 corporate and 4,000 non-corporate participants in 160 countries. Mr. Kell also oversaw the creation of the Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI), Sustainable Stock Exchange Initiative (SSE), and the Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME).

John Knox

UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment

Prof. John Knox is the first UN Special Rapporteur on human rights and the environment, appointed by the United Nations Human Rights Council in 2012. Prof. Knox is the Henry C. Lauerman Professor of International Law at Wake Forest University, in North Carolina, where he teaches and writes on human rights law, environmental law, and their relationship with one another.

Richard M. Locke

Provost, Brown University

Prof. Richard M. Locke is provost of Brown and Schreiber Family Professor of Political Science and Public and International Affairs. Prior to joining Brown in 2014, he had been a member of the MIT faculty for 25 years. Prof. Locke is an internationally respected scholar and authority on international labor relations and worker rights, comparative political economy, and corporate responsibility. He has published five books and numerous articles. He was recently awarded an inaugural Progress Medal by the Society for Progress.

Simon Lord

Chief Sustainability Officer, Sime Darby Plantation Berhad

Dr. Simon Lord is the Chief Sustainability Officer for Sime Darby Plantation Berhad. He was previously the Director of Sustainability for New Britain Palm Oil and the Director of Research. Dr. Lord began his career with Unilever PLC and has over 33 years experience in the agriculture commodities sector. Dr. Lord has held appointments on the Board of RSPO and numerous NGO initiatives.

Ulrika Nilsson

Managing Director, Global Child Forum

Ms. Ulrika Nilsson is the Managing Director of Global Child Forum. Previously, Ms. Nilsson was Director of Development at Lund University in charge of philanthropic partnerships and funding for strategic research and education. With more than 20 years’ experience from the financial and banking sector, Ms. Nilsson has served on several boards and is a Corporate Senior Advisor to Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI). She graduated from the School of Economics and Management, Lund University, with an MSc in Business and Economics.

Hanna Roberts

CEO, GES International

Ms. Hanna Roberts is the Chief Executive Officer of GES International, an owner advocate providing engagement services focusing on supporting asset owners and asset managers develop and implement integrated investment strategies with environmental, social and governance (ESG) considerations. Ms. Roberts has served as chairperson of both the Swedish chapter and international board of Amnesty International, as well as on the board of Business and Human Rights Resource Centre as well as the Global Child Forum.

Fiona Rotberg

Session Moderator

Dr. Fiona Rotberg is Director of Research at Global Child Forum. Prior to joining the team, she served as Executive Director at the Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, was Assistant Professor in the Political Science Department at Uppsala University, and a consultant at Arthur D. Little. Dr. Rotberg earned a PhD with distinction in International Law, Environment and Natural Resources from Tufts and Harvard University.

Nina Schefte

CSR Manager, Norsk Hydro

Ms. Nina Schefte has more than 20 years of professional experience from environmental and social responsibility in the public and private sector, including more than 10 years as Sustainability Manager for IKEA Norway. She has been a board member for several NGOs and member of the Norwegian Foreign Ministry´s Policy Coherence Committee. Ms. Schefte holds a master in environmental engineering and a master of management in strategic collaboration. She is passionate about how businesses can contribute to positive change and development for our common future.

Paul Schoenmakers

Head of Impact, Tony's Chocolonely

Tony’s Chocolonely exists to change the chocolate industry and make 100% slave free chocolate the norm. Mr. Paul Schoenmakers is responsible for Tony’s impact strategy and leads the impact team that works to improve the livelihoods of the farmers that supply their cocoa beans. In addition, Mr. Schoenmakers and his team are responsible for accelerating the change in the industry and build partnerships with others that want to take responsibility for their (chocolate) value chain.

Ruth Kesia Simatupang

Member, Indonesian Children’s Advisory Committee, Time to Talk!

Miss Ruth Kesia Simatupang is a member of the Indonesian Children’s Advisory Committee of the global Time to Talk! project which seeks to fulfill working children’s right to participation in decisions affecting them. Kesia is 17 years old and lives with her family in North Sumatra, Indonesia. She started working when she was 10 years old as a street singer and street vendor. Currently, she works as a scavenger together with her family to earn money for her school fees. Her dream is to get a better future as a teacher and make her parents proud.

Carine Smith Ihenacho

Chief Corporate Governance Officer, Norges Bank Investment Management

Ms. Carine Smith Ihenacho is Chief Corporate Governance Officer at Norges Bank Investment Management, the manager of Norway’s sovereign wealth fund. Ms. Smith Ihenacho is responsible for leading and developing the fund’s responsible investment strategy and activities. She holds a law degree from the University of Oslo, a Masters of Economics from the Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration and a Masters of Law from Harvard Law School.

Martin Tan

Executive Director, The Majurity Trust

Mr. Martin Tan is the Executive Director of The Majurity Trust, a philanthropic organisation with social impact programmes and platforms in Singapore. He was the Executive Director of Institute for Societal Leadership at Singapore Management University and Co-Founder of Halogen Foundation Singapore. Mr. Tan has worked with leaders in the public, private and people sector in over 14 countries. For his contributions to Singapore and the region, Mr. Tan was conferred the Singapore Youth Award, Singapore’s highest accolade for youth in 2013.

Julie Wallace

Global Head, Community Engagement, Standard Chartered Bank

Ms. Julie Wallace is currently the Global Head, Community Engagement for Standard Chartered Bank in London. In this capacity, she formulates the Bank’s sustainability strategy. Ms. Wallace also oversees the Bank’s global community investment programmes. Previously, she held positions focused on trade and development with the Canadian Embassy in Washington, Corporate Council on Africa and African Development Bank (ADB). Ms. Wallace has a MBA from Oxford University, MA in International Affairs from the George Washington University and BA from Millsaps College.

Léon Wijnands

Global Head of Sustainability, ING Bank

Mr. Léon Wijnands is Global Head of Sustainability at ING. Sustainability is a strategic priority for ING and built into the purpose of the company. The department has set the direction focussing on integrating sustainability into ING’s core business. The team is leading on disclosing non-financial information and defining ethical standards. Mr. Wijnands has more than 25 years of experience in banking, particularly in sales and marketing. He holds a master degree in business economics, business administration and in financial economics.


Show More


"Children’s rights are what the Global Goals are all about"

H.R.H Crown Princess Victoria. Read full speech here

 

 

ActionLabs

Global Child Forum’s ActionLabs provide a space for collaborative, thought-provoking work. In these moderated sessions, delegates engage in some of the most pressing challenges facing children today with the idea of generating actions to confront these challenges.

ActionLab 1

Corporate Impact on Community and Environment: Ensuring children’s wellbeing around supply chains and operations

The challenge: Children grow up in communities and environments that are impacted by business operations and supply chains. Families live next to factories, mines and agricultural fields all of which produce air, water and land pollution which are especially harmful to children.  Children also live in areas with rampant conflict around valuable resources, including land, forests and rivers and are particularly at risk of exploitation during conflict. Action: By sharing examples of company best practices, this session will discuss business responsibilities and opportunities to not only ensure that their operations and supply chains do not have an adverse effect on children’s wellbeing, but also incorporate the voices of communities, including children, to empower them and build sustainable communities.

ActionLab 2

The Business Case for Investing in Quality Education: Finding opportunities for impact

The challenge: The demands of a growing global economy require an increasingly skilled workforce – one that is computer literate, can handle data, can apply critical analysis and is creative. At the same time, progress in education has stalled and the quality of education varies widely, resulting in many children leaving primary school without basic reading, writing and math skills, let alone ICT and critical thinking skills. Providing all our children, and especially girls, with the high-quality education they will need to succeed is one of the greatest challenges we face. The action: A growing number of businesses are investing in long-term educational partnerships with civil society and governments, realising the mutual benefit for business and society of life-long learning, starting with the youngest. By sharing examples of how businesses can help improve access to quality education through innovation and partnership, this discussion will focus on the role business can play to accelerate progress in early childhood development and primary education.

ActionLab 3

Speaking Up: Young people’s participation in business decision making

  The challenge:  Young people around the world are often relegated to the side-lines and excluded from having a say in decisions that will affect them. One of the key elements of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child is the right of children to participate in decisions that affect them. Children are critical thinkers, change makers, communicators, innovators and future leaders. In recent years, the importance of young people’s participation in civil society has been increasingly recognised. However, young people´s participation in business decision-making is not as well articulated – yet business impacts children in many ways. Children are engaged in a diverse range of paid and unpaid work in urban and rural settings and they are consumers of products and services that can enhance as well as harm their lives. The action:  For business, young people’s views and input could inform how business work with their suppliers, how they structure their operations and how they develop their products and services to meet the needs and respect the rights of children and young people. How can business take children’s perspectives into their decision-making? How can business benefit from young people’s participation? In this ActionLab we will hear from young people who have been involved in a global study, to ascertain their thoughts about their work. We will also hear from companies who are actively consulting children and taking their views on board in creating better and safer environments, products and services.

ActionLab 4

Innovative Corporate Responses to Child Labour: Turning challenges into mutual opportunities

The challenge: Though data are scarce, we know that a significant portion of the 152 million children trapped in child labour are working in supply chains; accounting for almost one in ten children worldwide. They can be found working in mining and quarrying, in construction, services, agriculture and manufacturing, in every region in the world. While the dynamic picture indicates that we are moving in the right direction – child labour declined during the period from 2012 to 2016 – ensuring that this trend is maintained makes this one of the key challenges facing business. The action: This ActionLab will showcase innovative business practices that turn supply chain child right’s risks into opportunities to empower communities and their children, thereby building sustainable supply chains. Examples include living wage issues, family friendly practices as well as combating child labour. Through active discussion, sharing their knowledge and experiences of what really works and what the challenges are, delegates in this session will have the opportunity to give feedback to Global Child Forum’s latest research on initiatives to combat child labour. This research will be shared with delegates in draft form and will be finalized based on feedback received in this session. The purpose is to provide the business community with practical examples of how to take a child-centered and community-based approach to child labour.

ActionLab 1

Corporate Impact on Community and Environment: Ensuring children’s wellbeing around supply chains and operations

The challenge: Children grow up in communities and environments that are impacted by business operations and supply chains. Families live next to factories, mines and agricultural fields all of which produce air, water and land pollution which are especially harmful to children.  Children also live in areas with rampant conflict around valuable resources, including land, forests and rivers and are particularly at risk of exploitation during conflict.

Action: By sharing examples of company best practices, this session will discuss business responsibilities and opportunities to not only ensure that their operations and supply chains do not have an adverse effect on children’s wellbeing, but also incorporate the voices of communities, including children, to empower them and build sustainable communities.

ACTION LAB HOSTS

Facilitator:

Brian Ganson, Head, Africa Centre for Dispute Settlement at University of Stellenbosch Business School

Contributor:

Nina Schefte, CSR Manager, Norsk Hydro

Contributor:

Simon Lord, Chief Sustainability Officer, Sime Darby Plantation Berhad

Contributor:

Fiona Rotberg, Research Director, Global Child Forum

ActionLab 2

The Business Case for Investing in Quality Education: Finding opportunities for impact

The challenge: The demands of a growing global economy require an increasingly skilled workforce – one that is computer literate, can handle data, can apply critical analysis and is creative. At the same time, progress in education has stalled and the quality of education varies widely, resulting in many children leaving primary school without basic reading, writing and math skills, let alone ICT and critical thinking skills. Providing all our children, and especially girls, with the high-quality education they will need to succeed is one of the greatest challenges we face.

The action: A growing number of businesses are investing in long-term educational partnerships with civil society and governments, realising the mutual benefit for business and society of life-long learning, starting with the youngest. By sharing examples of how businesses can help improve access to quality education through innovation and partnership, this discussion will focus on the role business can play to accelerate progress in early childhood development and primary education.

ACTION LAB HOSTS

Facilitator:

Andrés Franco, Global Deputy Director of Private Sector, UNICEF

Contributor:

Afzal Habib, Co-Founder; Chief Imagination Officer, Kidogo

Contributor:

Fiona Smith, Initiatives Lead / Director, LEGO Foundation

Contributor:

Ingrid Eelde Koivisto, Founder & Secretary General, Pratham Sweden

Contributor:

Dr. Tessa Bold, Professor, Institute for International Economic Studies, Stockholm University

ActionLab 3

Speaking Up: Young people’s participation in business decision making

 

The challenge:  Young people around the world are often relegated to the side-lines and excluded from having a say in decisions that will affect them. One of the key elements of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child is the right of children to participate in decisions that affect them. Children are critical thinkers, change makers, communicators, innovators and future leaders. In recent years, the importance of young people’s participation in civil society has been increasingly recognised. However, young people´s participation in business decision-making is not as well articulated – yet business impacts children in many ways. Children are engaged in a diverse range of paid and unpaid work in urban and rural settings and they are consumers of products and services that can enhance as well as harm their lives.

The action:  For business, young people’s views and input could inform how business work with their suppliers, how they structure their operations and how they develop their products and services to meet the needs and respect the rights of children and young people. How can business take children’s perspectives into their decision-making? How can business benefit from young people’s participation? In this ActionLab we will hear from young people who have been involved in a global study, to ascertain their thoughts about their work. We will also hear from companies who are actively consulting children and taking their views on board in creating better and safer environments, products and services.

ACTION LAB HOSTS

Facilitator:

Marloes van der Have, Managing Director at the Missing Chapter Foundation

Contributor:

Johline Z. Lindholm, Project Coordinator, Telge Energi

Contributor:

Fredrika Inger, Global Business Area Manager, Children’s IKEA

Contributor:

Anne Jacob, Advocacy Officer, Kindernothilfe

Contributor:

Maryse Hazelzet, Sustainability Advisor, Dutch Banking Association

ActionLab 4

Innovative Corporate Responses to Child Labour: Turning challenges into mutual opportunities

The challenge: Though data are scarce, we know that a significant portion of the 152 million children trapped in child labour are working in supply chains; accounting for almost one in ten children worldwide. They can be found working in mining and quarrying, in construction, services, agriculture and manufacturing, in every region in the world. While the dynamic picture indicates that we are moving in the right direction – child labour declined during the period from 2012 to 2016 – ensuring that this trend is maintained makes this one of the key challenges facing business.

The action: This ActionLab will showcase innovative business practices that turn supply chain child right’s risks into opportunities to empower communities and their children, thereby building sustainable supply chains. Examples include living wage issues, family friendly practices as well as combating child labour. Through active discussion, sharing their knowledge and experiences of what really works and what the challenges are, delegates in this session will have the opportunity to give feedback to Global Child Forum’s latest research on initiatives to combat child labour. This research will be shared with delegates in draft form and will be finalized based on feedback received in this session. The purpose is to provide the business community with practical examples of how to take a child-centered and community-based approach to child labour.

ACTION LAB HOSTS

Host:

Ulrika Nilsson, Managing Director, Global Child Forum

Facilitator:

Aarti Kapoor, Managing Director and Lead Consultant, Embode

Contributor:

Ines Kämpfer, Executive Director, CCR CSR

Contributor:

Virginie Mahin, Senior External Affairs Manager, Mondelēz International

Global Child Forum 2018

Global Child Forum in Stockholm 2018