Global Child Forum
11 April 2018

Investing in Every Child.

The Global Child Forum at the Stockholm Royal Palace on 11 April 2018 will bring together a global community of leaders from business, civil society, academia and government to fast-track business action and partnerships to achieve a more prosperous, equitable and sustainable world for our children.

Featuring exciting and engaging plenary speakers alongside thematic ActionLab sessions, the Forum will encourage you to initiate and share bold solutions to the difficult issues facing children today. Join us and discover how you can play a leading role in meeting today’s global challenges by investing in children.

The forum is by invitation-only. For more information, please contact forum18@globalchildforum.org

Check back for frequent updates to the programme.

With more than 300 attendees from all sectors and compass points, 4 ActionLabs and networking opportunities, the Global Child Forum in Stockholm will let you connect with influencers to create opportunities to advance children’s rights while positively impacting your bottom line.

Will this be your first Global Child Forum?
Take a look at the report from Global Child Forum 2015.

300+

global leaders from business, civil society, academia and government

40+

nationalities representing diverse points of view

Unlimited

opportunities to advance children's rights in your sphere of influence

ActionLabs

Global Child Forum’s ActionLabs provide a space for collaborative, thought-provoking work. In these moderated sessions, delegates engage in some of the most pressing challenges facing children today with the idea of generating actions to confront these challenges.

ActionLab 1

Corporate impact on community and environment: Ensuring Children’s Wellbeing around Supply Chains and Operations

The challenge: Children grow up in communities and environments that are impacted by business operations and supply chains. Families live next to factories, mines and agricultural fields all of which produce air, water and land pollution which are especially harmful to children.  Children also live in areas with rampant conflict around valuable resources, including land, forests and rivers and are particularly at risk of exploitation during conflict. Action: By sharing examples of company best practices, this session will discuss business responsibilities and opportunities to not only ensure that their operations and supply chains do not have an adverse effect on children’s wellbeing, but also incorporate the voices of communities, including children, to empower them and build sustainable communities.

ActionLab 2

The business case for investing in quality education: Finding opportunities for impact

The challenge: The demands of a growing global economy require an increasingly skilled workforce – one that is computer literate, can handle data, can apply critical analysis and is creative. At the same time, progress in education has stalled and the quality of education varies widely, resulting in many children leaving primary school without basic reading, writing and math skills, let alone ICT and critical thinking skills. Providing all our children, and especially girls, with the high-quality education they will need to succeed is one of the greatest challenges we face. The action: A growing number of businesses are investing in long-term educational partnerships with civil society and governments, realising the mutual benefit for business and society of life-long learning, starting with the youngest. By sharing examples of how businesses can help improve access to quality education through innovation and partnership, this discussion will focus on the role business can play to accelerate progress in early childhood development and primary education.

ActionLab 3

Speaking up: Youth participation in business decision-making

The challenge:  Young people around the world are often relegated to the side-lines and excluded from having a say in decisions that will affect them.One of the key elements of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child is the right of children to participate in decisions that affect them. In recent years, the importance of youth participation in civil society has been increasingly recognised. Children are critical thinkers, change makers, communicators, innovators and future leaders. However, youth participation in business decision-making is not as well articulated – yet business impacts children in many ways. Children are engaged in a diverse range of paid and unpaid work in urban and rural settings and they are consumers of products and services that can enhance as well as harm their lives. The action:  For business, children’s views and input could inform how business work with their suppliers, how they structure their operations and how they develop their products and services to meet the needs and respect the rights of young people. How can business take children’s perspective into their decision-making? How can business benefit from children’s participation? In this ActionLab we will hear from youth who have been involved in a global study, to ascertain their thoughts about their work. We will also hear from companies who are actively consulting children and taking their views on board in creating better and safer environments, products and services.  

ActionLab 4

An integrated response to child labour: Turning Supply Chain Challenges into Mutual Opportunities

The challenge: Though data are scarce, we know that a significant portion of the 152 million children trapped in child labour are working in supply chains; accounting for almost one in ten children worldwide. They can be found working in mining and quarrying, in construction, services, agriculture and manufacturing, in every region in the world. While the dynamic picture indicates that we are moving in the right direction – child labour declined during the period from 2012 to 2016 – ensuring that this trend is maintained makes this one of the key challenges facing business. The action: While the sheer scale of the problem can be daunting, companies have the opportunity to positively impact the lives of children throughout their operations and supply chains. This ActionLab will showcase innovative business practices that turn supply chain child right’s risks into opportunities to empower communities and their children, thereby building sustainable supply chains. Delegates in this session will discuss how companies can respect children’s rights and also tackle root causes to positively impact future generations. Examples include living wage issues, family friendly practices as well as combating child labour.

ActionLab 1

Corporate impact on community and environment: Ensuring Children’s Wellbeing around Supply Chains and Operations

The challenge: Children grow up in communities and environments that are impacted by business operations and supply chains. Families live next to factories, mines and agricultural fields all of which produce air, water and land pollution which are especially harmful to children.  Children also live in areas with rampant conflict around valuable resources, including land, forests and rivers and are particularly at risk of exploitation during conflict.

Action: By sharing examples of company best practices, this session will discuss business responsibilities and opportunities to not only ensure that their operations and supply chains do not have an adverse effect on children’s wellbeing, but also incorporate the voices of communities, including children, to empower them and build sustainable communities.

ActionLab 2

The business case for investing in quality education: Finding opportunities for impact

The challenge: The demands of a growing global economy require an increasingly skilled workforce – one that is computer literate, can handle data, can apply critical analysis and is creative. At the same time, progress in education has stalled and the quality of education varies widely, resulting in many children leaving primary school without basic reading, writing and math skills, let alone ICT and critical thinking skills. Providing all our children, and especially girls, with the high-quality education they will need to succeed is one of the greatest challenges we face.

The action: A growing number of businesses are investing in long-term educational partnerships with civil society and governments, realising the mutual benefit for business and society of life-long learning, starting with the youngest. By sharing examples of how businesses can help improve access to quality education through innovation and partnership, this discussion will focus on the role business can play to accelerate progress in early childhood development and primary education.

ActionLab 3

Speaking up: Youth participation in business decision-making

The challenge:  Young people around the world are often relegated to the side-lines and excluded from having a say in decisions that will affect them.One of the key elements of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child is the right of children to participate in decisions that affect them. In recent years, the importance of youth participation in civil society has been increasingly recognised. Children are critical thinkers, change makers, communicators, innovators and future leaders. However, youth participation in business decision-making is not as well articulated – yet business impacts children in many ways. Children are engaged in a diverse range of paid and unpaid work in urban and rural settings and they are consumers of products and services that can enhance as well as harm their lives.

The action:  For business, children’s views and input could inform how business work with their suppliers, how they structure their operations and how they develop their products and services to meet the needs and respect the rights of young people. How can business take children’s perspective into their decision-making? How can business benefit from children’s participation?

In this ActionLab we will hear from youth who have been involved in a global study, to ascertain their thoughts about their work. We will also hear from companies who are actively consulting children and taking their views on board in creating better and safer environments, products and services.

 

ActionLab 4

An integrated response to child labour: Turning Supply Chain Challenges into Mutual Opportunities

The challenge: Though data are scarce, we know that a significant portion of the 152 million children trapped in child labour are working in supply chains; accounting for almost one in ten children worldwide. They can be found working in mining and quarrying, in construction, services, agriculture and manufacturing, in every region in the world. While the dynamic picture indicates that we are moving in the right direction – child labour declined during the period from 2012 to 2016 – ensuring that this trend is maintained makes this one of the key challenges facing business.

The action: While the sheer scale of the problem can be daunting, companies have the opportunity to positively impact the lives of children throughout their operations and supply chains. This ActionLab will showcase innovative business practices that turn supply chain child right’s risks into opportunities to empower communities and their children, thereby building sustainable supply chains. Delegates in this session will discuss how companies can respect children’s rights and also tackle root causes to positively impact future generations. Examples include living wage issues, family friendly practices as well as combating child labour.

Investing in every child

Film from Global Child Forum on South America 2017

Photos from Global Child Forum in Stockholm 2015